When 2% is very important!

Why is everything that starts off so very promising, always end up with a sour taste?

Essex Police are doing a tour of schools to educate 13-14yo girls to encourage them to report any ‘sex’ offences they may have been subjected to. So far, so good.

But don’t get your hopes up, because, Very Important to mention is the seriousness and consequences of making ‘false allegations’.

Girls to get advice about reporting sex offences

POLICE will visit schools urging young girls to report sex offences they may have been subjected to.

Officers will specifically talk with 13 and 14-year-olds and also warn them of the consequences of making false allegations of rape.

The new project will be piloted at four schools in Southend, where pupils in Year 9 will be given a programme of lessons over a school term. As well as educating youngsters about sexual violence, the initiative will offer referrals to pregnancy counsellors for teenagers who are already sexually active.

Parent Rita Hickey, of Elmsleigh Drive, Leigh, who has a 15-year-old daughter, Kirsty, feels the lessons are a positive idea, provided they are appropriately presented.

She said: “It’s good to encourage awareness and I think this would be a good thing, as long as it’s done the right way.

“It’s all part of education these days. Nowadays kids are so much more mature and are often more knowledgeable than adults.”

The new project is being spearheaded by Southend police in partnership with Southend Council and the South East Essex Primary Care Trust.

The Sexual Safety Awareness Group, being chaired by Southend police’s Det Chief Insp Lesley Ford, is still in the early stages of planning and it is not yet known which schools it will visit.

The details of the group were revealed in the quarterly report of Essex’s Chief Constable Jim Barker-McCardle.

It read: “The Sexual Safety Awareness Group has been set up to deliver a consistent message to young people regarding sexual safety. The agreed aims of the group include promoting sensible choices and responsible reporting.

“Support services include a referral to teenage pregnancy counsellors for teenagers who are engaging in, or considering engaging in, sexual activity.

“Responsible reporting is about encouraging young people to report acts of sexual violence against them, whilst at the same time explaining the consequences of making false reports to police and other services.”

Tracy Williams, 48, of Wakering Road, Shoebury, who has daughters aged 17 and 14, said: “I think a lot of teenagers are largely unaware of the dangers of some of the situations they can find themselves in.

“Parents should educate their daughters about these things, but sadly that doesn’t always happen, so this must be a good thing.

“I would want to see parents involved in this process, though.

“If social services and police are dealing with teenagers who are in trouble, then parents should be involved, rather than it all being done behind their backs.”

Yes indeedy, must stress the importance of those false allegations, even though they only make up only 2% of reported sexual crimes, and false reporting is the same rate (or actually LOWER)  than many other crimes. But yeah, let’s focus on the 2%. Let’s also ignore that you are most likely to go to all the trouble of reporting the assault, perhaps even go through more trauma on the witness stand, and more likely than not, see your attacker skip merrily into the sunset. I bet they miss that part out.

Rape conviction rates have marginally crept up to 7% (2007) from 6.1% (2006), however, it is still very much a postcode lottery. Some areas have gone up, others down. View the 2006 map vs 2007 map of conviction rates. My particular county has dropped almost 25% in that period, from 4% to 3.1%. Hardly confidence inspiring in the local constabulary and criminal justice system. Let’s just say I won’t be writing home  about the fact that my county is less than half the national average.

Indeed, the only bright spot on the newspaper page was the comment from a resident:

A.Winnie, says…
I hope this expands to boys also,
And teaches about peer pressure and that boys using emotional blackmail on young girls is wrong especially at a time when hormones and emotions could be all over the place.
Also about living with the consequences of such behaviour.

Excellent. Commonsense is not dead and buried. There might even be a stealthy underground feminist movement nearby!

So my comment to Essex Police is why you are focusing on the puny 2%, when 98% of rapists get away with it? Your track record of less than half the national average conviction rate is hardly anything to be proud of, nor very encouraging for victims to actually report the crime in the first place.

I think we should worry about the 2% of false reporting when your conviction rate at least significantly hits double digits, don’t you?
– – – – –
I have added the table of the 2006-2007 comparisons. The Word document at Fawcett is badly formatted. I have ordered it in order of 2007 uselessness.

14 thoughts on “When 2% is very important!

  1. m Andrea

    Er, girls have had enough of “sexual awareness” by now, if this message isn’t being delivered to the boys then it’s worthless. WHAT ABOUT THE BOYS??? Tell them their behavior needs to shape up!

    I love what you doing over here, in case that needs to be said. 🙂

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  2. FAB Libber

    Thanks mA. Have been a long time admirer of your work.
    I suppose that begging won’t work to get you blogging again?

    I will bet that the ‘awareness campaign’ does not really include all the coersion, date rape scenarios etc. There was probably a lot of ‘awareness’ of what Real Rape™ consists of. Strangers. Bushes. Leaping out at virgins on their way to choir practise. Modestly dressed.

    All this from a force with the three-way tie for third-worst conviction rate. Nice.
    Worst conviction rate is 1.6% (Dorset) followed by 2.9% (Warwickshire) and three-way tie of 3.1% of Cambridgeshire, Suffolk and Essex. Pathetic does not even begin to cover it.

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  3. Jilla

    Isn’t that pathetic. Part of the problem would be they’d have to be dragging their best buds assws to court, very likely, and their own brothers-in-law, sons. Can’t have that.

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  4. ball buster

    Holy shit! That’s like the UK version of the way the US abuses the word “alleged.” People ALWAYS talk about women coming forward, yet coddle the rapists and prioritize them ahead of their victims. The fact that the POLICE are doing this, is even worse. Ok, I get that the media is full of a bunch of assholes, but the POLICE?? The POLICE who are the first responders in this terrible situations?

    My god. Rapists always tell their victims the police won’t believe them. After their nice little chat with the cops the girls are going to put two and two together and not report it at all.

    I’m almost afraid of asking how they define consent.

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  5. Aileen Wuornos

    Officers will specifically talk with 13 and 14-year-olds and also warn them of the consequences of making false allegations of rape.

    Oh for fucks sakes. Are they going to talk to the boys about the consequences of raping womyn and girls? Oh wait, at the moment, there aren’t any.

    Indeed, the only bright spot on the newspaper page was the comment from a resident:

    A.Winnie, says…
    I hope this expands to boys also,
    And teaches about peer pressure and that boys using emotional blackmail on young girls is wrong especially at a time when hormones and emotions could be all over the place.
    Also about living with the consequences of such behaviour.

    Excellent. Commonsense is not dead and buried. There might even be a stealthy underground feminist movement nearby!

    Thank fuck.

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  6. Jilla

    No mention that it is MALES who rape. How can you talk about sexual assault and no-one ever says who it is doing it?

    Where can we write?

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  7. Aileen Wuornos

    No mention that it is MALES who rape. How can you talk about sexual assault and no-one ever says who it is doing it?

    This whole gender-identity me me me pomo bullshit generally says stupid shit like “but men can be victimzzz too!!!” without addressing like you say, it is MEN who rape. I posted the Biting Beaver’s Rapist Checklist on tumblr a little a while a go and was inundated with such a shit storm of “oh but but it’s not just men who rape!” … i’ve only EVER seen ONE case of a “female rapist” and all the guys were like “oh i would have banged her anyway”

    http://www.yelp.com/topic/san-francisco-black-widow-woman-who-drugged-raped-ten-men

    you know what else? i can’t actually find ANY news articles about it, just the discussion. which makes me think this is a load of shit.

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  8. Jilla

    Clonidine is an antihypertensive, not a sedative. It’s most noted side effect is erectile dysfunction.

    The story sounds like a typical BDSM fantasy.

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  9. FAB Libber

    you know what else? i can’t actually find ANY news articles about it, just the discussion. which makes me think this is a load of shit.

    It certainly has the earmarks of an urban legend. I only got re-blogged results, no primary news articles. Also, the name “Valeria” really does not sound terribly Russian.
    Most likely a pile of bsdm-fantacist shit.

    There is not any need for females to drug their male victims, most males will fuck anything including park benches.

    ETA: The closest thing I got to a news source was this one, which looks to be more of a ‘lifestyle’ thing rather than legit newspaper.

    inquisitr.com/26696/russian-black-widow-woman-arrested-for-raping-10-men/

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  10. joy

    BB, you didn’t know the police were shitstains?!

    I’ve had cops show up when I reported rape, carrying unsheathed batons. To speak with ME. No, that wasn’t triggersome or frightening or inappropriate!

    I’ve had them discuss me in front of me — “Bitch is just crazy.”

    I’ve had them tell me, “You probably just regret it, or he made you mad and you want to get back at him.”

    I’ve had them say, when my abuser was put into custody for beating me (and others) and I stood there bruised and shaking and disoriented, “So … you’re just gonna bail him back out anyway. All you girls do. So you wanna just do it now and save us some trouble?”

    And that’s just me. They do worse to other women. They’ve watched other women die and/or sustain serious injuries, right in front of them (I’m thinking the DV case where the fuzz watched a man in their custody beat, knock down, and then jump on the head of his wife who’d called to have him arrested; he broke her neck while the cops looked on). They don’t believe us, or care about us, or even conduct themselves with the least little bit of compassion or dignity.

    The police are not and have never been our friends.

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  11. FAB Libber

    I posted this in the other thread, but I think I meant to post it here. Senior moment.

    Well, for those who don’t already know, police/military dudes have twice the perp rate of DV than other dudes, that right there is a flag of the rouge kind.

    Two stories in the news today.
    A woman died on the railway tracks last night (no details, but possibly fleeing?). The cops were called out to “a domestic incident” an hour or two before and were “dealing with it” (not well I might add). The have since arrested dude on charges of ‘false imprisonment’. Dude is 45 and believed to be the partner of 25yo woman killed.
    http://www.eveningstar.co.uk/news/update_brandon_rail_death_followed_domestic_incident_police_reveal_1_829849

    A Devon police officer has been sentenced for ‘having sex’ whilst on duty. He was cleared of the rape charges. So it seems that the establishment really are only miffed at him for bunking off on duty, not for being a rapist. There had been more about this story leading up to the sentence, the woman insisted it was rape, and he seemed to be stalking her a bit too.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-12748457

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  12. joy

    Are police not men?

    Are police not typically bully-men to begin with? Otherwise they wouldn’t have become police.

    So these are bully-men, armed to the teeth and given the ultimate power, the power of THE LAW, over all other humans.

    Fucked-up shit results. Both on the job and off. (On-the-job sensitivity training for cops, by the way, being nothing but a sad sick joke.)

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